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A list of companies most likely to go IPO came across my Facebook wall the other day, and this list was created by Goldman Sachs.

Now, most of you will say, “Well, so what, it’s another list.” But something caught my eye in this piece, as the companies listed are STARTUPS:

“So why hold a conference for early stage companies if you’re an IPO underwriter? Well, the event basically functions as an extremely foresighted form of lead generation. According to multiple people I spoke to, these are the 30 or so startups Goldman has designated as potential IPO candidates. And it wants to make a relationship as early on as possible, in case some of them actually do and need Goldman’s services in the process.”

Oddly enough, nonprofits might be able to learn a thing or two from GS…

What are your organization’s steps to identify who, amongst your constituents, members, and prospects, are most likely to go MGO (major gift offering)? Has your organization developed that type of analysis internally, and, if so, how are you watching your list (checking it twice…) (sorry, I couldn’t resist)? And does your organization see the value in starting the relationship as early as possible?

If your organization has not started this type of identification and subsequent watch list, what is holding you back?

If you’ve ever attended one of our conference presentations focused on “Where’s the Money Now?”, you may recall my mentioning the WSJ’s Next Big Thing, and how I believe every nonprofit, especially with a prospect research department, could create their own internal scoring and ranking of certain prospects, using the WSJ methodology, easily. Check it out here for some inspiration to create your own score and then don’t forget to make your most likely to go MGO list…check it twice…

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